Quaerentes in Extremis

Welcome to your Adventure Log!
A blog for your campaign

Every campaign gets an Adventure Log, a blog for your adventures!

While the wiki is great for organizing your campaign world, it’s not the best way to chronicle your adventures. For that purpose, you need a blog!

The Adventure Log will allow you to chronologically order the happenings of your campaign. It serves as the record of what has passed. After each gaming session, come to the Adventure Log and write up what happened. In time, it will grow into a great story!

Best of all, each Adventure Log post is also a wiki page! You can link back and forth with your wiki, characters, and so forth as you wish.

One final tip: Before you jump in and try to write up the entire history for your campaign, take a deep breath. Rather than spending days writing and getting exhausted, I would suggest writing a quick “Story So Far” with only a summary. Then, get back to gaming! Grow your Adventure Log over time, rather than all at once.

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Spring 1220
The Hunt

The latest storyline “The Hunt” has turned out to be a doozey. Fearghus’ friend and woodland guide Sweet Gille was approached by David, the steward to local nobles household, who was desperate for help to save his lord. The lord’s son had recently been killed on an expedition to hunt a legendary beast – the Black Boar of the Bog, who aggressively guards the tangled bog and forest that run along the Glen Luce Sands. The young man was not the campaigner that his father wanted to be and learning of this beast, he decided to gain his father’s respect by slaying it. things did not go according to plan. The young man was supposedly killed, while his 2 attendant’s fled home and reported the mishap. Racked with grief, the youth’s father vowed vengeance against the beast and set off to kill it himself. The steward fearing the final outcome, sought assistance from Gille, who he know as a seasoned tracker and hunter.

Gille knew that this was the type of adventure that his friend Fearghus would love so he asked him to help. Fearghus offered a slot to the new mage at the Covenant Marcus of Tremere. They took Gille, the burn-scarred grog Claude, and servant woman Annie (to handle the camp duties, and who may also be sweet on Sweet Gille) along and tried to get to Glen Luce before the lord. Soon after passing the Glen Luce Abbey, they arrived at the Lord’s camp just inside the swamp. It was determined that they would assist the lord on his hunt. The next day, they ventured deeper into the bog. The Glen Luce Bog

Once Gille and the lord’s hounds found the boar’s trail they moved even deeper, until they found a cold white hand raised from a shallow burn (stream). They had found the unlucky young hunter. The father was even more dedicated to bring this boar to its end.

The steward and one of the lord’s men-at-arms took the body back to their base camp. They were accompanied by Marcus and the serving girl Annie, while the rest of the two groups ventured deeper after the boar’s trail. When he had a chance, Marcus called forth the ghost of the young man, and learned that David was the one who had planted the idea of the board hunt in the youth’s mind. Under questioning by Marcus and Annie, David didn’t deny this fact, but insisted that he didn’t think that the boy was brave enough to undertake this quest for respect and said he tried to dissuade the boy from going.

Fearghus , Gille, Claude and the lord and his party all stopped to make camp. The going had been hard and treacherous amongst the twisted trees and shifting marsh grasses. Stopping for the night, the party just collapsed barely making camp. During the night, a loud noise cam from the brush. Fear crept into the souls of everyone there, and without a moments thought, Fearghus , Gille, Claude and one of the lord’s men at arms fled along with the few dogs that could break free from their tethers. The lord and his houndmaster and one other stood to face the charging beast. The last thing Fearghus saw as he fled was a great black boar, as tall as a man, with red tusks and yellow eyes. The Black Boar
**

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Spring 1220 Continued
The Hunt; Part 2

Marcus of Tremere heard the sound of something large crashing through the woods toward their camp. He gathered his claok and ready his spells, just as a huge fearful beast came bursting onto the scene – Fearghus! The giant wizard’s eyes were white with fear. Hoarse from running, Fearghus was muttering something about a beast that had he had to flee. He could nto decsribe what had happened only that he felt the need to flee and had been running (the four hour distance) throughout the evening.

Falling back on on his strongest form, Marcus wove a spontaneous rego-muto spell to calm his soldales. The others in the camp were woken and plied Feargus with questions. It appears that the Black Boar had came on their camp, preceeded by a wave of fear that swept up Fearghus Ex Misc, Sweet Gillie, Claude the Grog and at least one of Sir Edgar’s man-at-arms. The son was soon rising, so Marcus, Feargus, and Sir Edgar’s remaining man-at-arms decided to return to Sir Edgar’s camp. Because of the danger, Annie was left at the base camp with David, Sir. Edgar’s steward and the body of Sir Edgar’s son.

On their way back, the group of mages encountered Claude and Gillie. Casting an Aura of Enobled Presence, Marcus ordered the men to stop fleeing and to follow him. The rise of the sun ended the spell cast by the Black Boar but a linger of trepdidation remained. Fearghus remembered the importance of his parma magica and performed his morning sheidling ritual. Marcus did the same. Once they found Sir. Edgar’s camp, the place was in shambles. The knight was found under the roots of an overturned tree, where he had scrampled after being struck by the boar and loosing his spear. Fallen Tree Fortunately, he had pulled the wounded Tall Borou, his huntsman in soon after and both survived the Blakc Boar’s destruction of their camp. Fearghus cast a PeHe spell rotting the roots to more easily extract the lord and his man. Then Feargus did what he could magically to bind the two men’s wounds, but regreted that he could not offer a permenent healing.

Now better armed (martially, magically, and with more caution) the party journeyed deeper into the bog. They crossed an interesection of streams comming from a pond and noticed that they were in a magical aura of 1. Going deeped they ran across a grass bog, on the other side of which was a darker forest, circling a great oak tree. Before entering the forest, the mages made sure that the boar’s tracks led that way. Feargus rubbed ogham runes beneath his eyes and cast MuCo Eyes of the Cat. He did the same for Gillie, Claude and Marcus before offering the same spell to Sir. Edgar and his men. They also soon learned that the aura under the forest canopy was level 5.

Once inside the forest they saw more animals, that appeared without fear of the human intruders. They also saw the Black Boar resting beneath the might oak tree. Boar’s Oak Preparing for his charge, Fearghus began making a circle that crossed their trail and part of the clearning. When the Boar plowed through he missed Fearghus and struck after the rest of the money. Gillie’s bowstring broke and he had to stay out of the way. Marcus held back ready to stop any man from fleeing. He had to counter the Boar’s magica a few times.

When combat ensued, it was Claude, screaming “Bacon!” that struck most often with his poleaxe. The firescarred grog battled on, even after he slipped under the Board and lost his axe. Edgar and his Man at Arms were able to land crippling blows to the Boar as well. Eventually the great beast, which stood higher than the largest horses was brought down. Marcus and Fearghus had Gillie and Borou dress the kill and in an act of chivalry offered Edgar the chamion’s portion of the beast. However, they kept the monster’s two tusk, which held 4 pawns of animal vis each.

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Spring 1220 Cont.
The Hunt Part 3 and Nelda's Lament

Following the slaying of the Boar and its butchering by the two huntsmen, the magi and Lord Edgar had to decide whether to stay the night or attempt to leave the swamp as dusk neared. Deciding the dry hill that was home to the Black Boar’s lair was safe enough, Fearghus drew a protective circle to protect the party from beast of legends and other magical creatures. Marcus added a ward against spirits around the camp as well. Binding the parties wounds magically and with first aid, the group enjoyed their feast of Boar meat and waited for Dawn with a fire blazing in the darkness beneath the Great Oak.

During the night a rustling and commotion was heard, and the party was surprised to see a small wild piglet scratch and snort near Fearghus’ circle of protection. The ever gruff Claude grabbed hi poleaxe to strike the wee beastie, but Fearghus stopped him. “Let ‘em be” the giant said. “He is likely the son of the great beast we just killed.” Marcus added that “This is the way of the land. The Boar’s replacement as protector of this bog will not be of any concern for some time as this little pig grows.” Understanding that this new protector for the animals needed a chance to come into his own power, the wizards wisely cautioned against stopping the process. They also knew that the when it grew, it too would have valuable Vis.

The next day, the party left the Boar’s oak tree and back the way they came. Once they reached their last campsite, where they had been attacked by the Black Boar of the Bog, Fearghus pointed out “Ye canna follow the trail I left in me flight from here.” Once back at the base camp, the group collected Annie their servant, David the Steward and the body of Sir Edgar’s son. If they traveled quickly and went almost due north they could reach Glen Luce Abbey, the Cistercian Abbey on the edge of the bog.

However, on their way, Claude and Gille who were in the vanguard were stopped by the sound of a woman crying. It started with echoes of her voice, calling out again and again for Ennoc, her husband. The echoes can be followed to the water’s edge, where a woman appears, bent double on her knees, grasping at the earth, wailing and crying, a despair like no other. Ghost in the bog Gille, always susceptible to a lady, fell to his knees and cried along with the figure kneeling up ahead at the water’s edge. The rest of the party joined them as Claude attempted to pull Gille away. Others in the group fell sway to the crying. The lament appeared to have no other effect than bringing forth the feeling of loss and sadness that this ghostly figure felt. They feared a faerie but Marcus informed them that it was a ghost.

Fearghus noticed with his second sight that the tears glowed with moonlight. Sensing magic was afoot, he cast an Intellego Vim spell and saw that some of the tears, the glowing ones, contained Mentum Vis. He collected the tears (6 pawns) and assisted Marcus who was able to pull the others along. They decided not to banish the ghost as she offered a ready supply of Mentum Vis to can be collected on the night that the spirit of Nelda returns.

Once away, David told them that as a novice at the Abbey, they were told the ghost story to discourage them from venturing into the swamp. He explained, “There are some stories that are as old as time, and this is one such tale. Many years ago Nelda, daughter to a rich and powerful chieftain, succumbed to the charms of a beautiful yet lowly shepherd. She fled her father’s house and his riches in order to marry her beloved Ennoc. Nelda and her lover were happy until the chieftain’s men found them and chased Ennoc out into the marsh. Nelda followed swiftly on but being lost, alone, and despairing she slipped into a stream and was drowned, never knowing if her beloved husband had lived or died.”

The magi learned that at this site of Nelda’s drowning, there is a magical aura of level 3. When winter turns to spring, on this day which is the first full moon after Saint Patrick’s day (March 17), the place where she died seems to remember her. Those without magic resistance or supernatural abilities experience a temporary +1 Despair Personality Trait. Those affected by the trait who break down and cry with Nelda’s spirit find that their tears contain Mentem vis.

After this adventure, they finally reached Glen Luce Abbey, where they were welcomed if not warmly, thanks to the effects of the gift. Edgar and David were led into the chapel where the monks let the corpse lie in a vigil. The Covenants’ group were house in the stables. At least they were warm and away from the cold damp bog. The next day the Covenant party took their leave while David took the body back and Edgar remained at Glen Luce Abbey to heal.

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Winter 1220-1221
Church of St. Lazarus

The Church of St. Lazarus

In the late Winter of 1221, the magi set out for Berwick on Tweed, where Marcus and Fearghus retrieved a shipment of lab ware from the Venetian trader Giovanni. In addition, Marcus’ maid and bodyguard Viznja arrived on the same ship from the Mediterranean, and the two were reunited. The two wizards had brought the McDoughal brothers Hammish and Seamish along as guards and company.

Following their meeting with Trader Giovanni, Fearghus was approached by a monk who introduced himself as Brother Paedrick, a monk from Glen Luce Abbey. The older monk believed he had seen Fearghus or at least a much larger version of the man who stood before him in Berwick. Fearghus said that he had been at the abbey but he didn’t comment on the size, which the Scottish wizard now controlled with the MuCo spell Preternatural Growth, which he had invented over the Winter.

The trip back to the covenant was generally uneventful except for the shadowing of the party as they traveled through the Cheviot Hills and the lands under the domain of the Covenant Horsingus. Neither wizard wanted to test the hospitality of these Saxon wizards or the limits of the Code, so they moved on. After crossing the river at Dumfries, the party discovered a body floating in one of the tributaries that had to be crossed by a ford. The body was that of a teenaged girl. The monk, claimed to be trained in the healing arts and the ways of the body and so he examined the chilled corpse. She had suffered from the pox before death, but had also been mutilated along her back. Strange symbols were carved in her flesh, but they appeared to have occurred after her death.
Curious and needing a breach in travel, the magi suggested that Brother Paedrick accompany them farther up stream to see where the body came from. They could return the corpse to her family and maybe explore the sinister markings they had seen on the body. So the party marched onward.

At village of Trauquer, the party first encountered a stone church of some size with a small village behind it. …

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Spring 1221
The Brook Trool - Grencki

This story features Sir Peleas as he searches for a water demon or sprite that chased off the Covenant’s grogs from a pool. The pool was a site for finding muto vis, in the form of small pieces of furniture and furnishings. Peleas was accompanied by the outlaw poacher Sweet Gille and Viszna, Marcus’ maid servant.

The pool was fed by a brook. A path followed the brook up into the hills. The party took the path to discover whaere the small pieces of furniture came from and where the beast that had chased off the grogs (one said he saw an otter leave the water soon after the attack).

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Spring 1221
The Cross on the Shore or The Caerryan Mystery

The Covenant was contacted by a magus in another Tribunal about a former companion who feared a supernatural threat on his life. The former companion was Sir Gilbert Montrey, the lord of Castle Kennedy and the fishing hamlet of Caerryan on eastern shore of Loch Ryan.

His young wife had drowned on the nearby beach three years ago, and he always maintained a vigil on the anniversary of her death. Recently, a troupe of players came through his lands and among their acrobats and knife throwers they had a mystic woman who read his and his steward’s future including his imminent death’ at another’s hands.’ She told his steward that he would pass before Sir Gilbert. After the steward’s body was discovered on the beach where Gilbert’s wife died, the local lord clearly feared the same would befall him.

As a favor Marcus and Fearghus answered the call for help. They engaged a Norwegian ship captain, Bjornn, and rowed to Caerryan. There they interviewed the lord and his servants. They were accosted by wild animals turned ferocious by some magic, which they later learned was the work of some sea faeries. Having settled on Stephen Argile, the local village leader as the suspect, they lost their suspect when their arcane connection to him appeared to flee the area for the high moors above Castle Kennedy. Refusing to leave the proximity of Sir Gilbert, the party were forced to defend him from the sea folk as they rushed the shore to drag Gilbert and some of his men into the surf to drown during his overnight vigil. In the rising mist, their Argile also attacked. The party had learned away from GIlbert that Argile had been the lover of Gilbert’s wife, the Lady Alicia and had drowned her out of jealousy. They defeated the sea folk and Feargus killed Argile with his war hammer. Marcus quickly summoned Argile’s shade and questioned it with threats of harm to his soul.

Later the party journeyed into the Moor to learn the fate of the lost arcane connection. Argile had used some sort of faerie trick as they were in cahoots to send it with a dog that belonged to two strangers camping on the moor. Confronted, the strangers revealed that they were William Montrey the long lost brother of Gilbert who had been lost during the crusade and presumed dead along with his scots bowman John of Orkney. With this family reunion, William Montrey swore assistance to the covenant if it was ever needed. Gilbert also offered the covenant the vis (aurum) rights to the Seer’s Cave, a steam producing hole a short Cliffside walk from Caerryan.

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Spring 1222
The Grand Tour of France and Italy - Part 1

In the Springe of 1221, Marcus of Tremere received a letter via Redcap from a Priest in Italy. It has originally been sent to his home Tremere covenant and was slow to find him in Scotland. The letter read:

_To Stephanus of House Malaspina or to the man once known by that name,
In this Season of Lent in the Year of the Lord 1217, I, Ft. Martinus of the Parish of Fratta Todina, write to you upon the last wish of a most loyal servant, who despite his crimes against man and God, begged our Lord’s forgiveness, confessed and I pray was redeemed.

This man Piero, was a servant of the Malaspina family in Monte Castillo di Vibio. He confessed that he gave you to an evil man, but by doing so saved your life. He said he was told that you would be taken to east, beyond the Dalmatians and into the lands of the Magyar. It is to there that I send his last words.

He pled for me to send you word that your birthright the estate outside Monte Castillo di Vibio, as the last in the line of the Malaspina, was yours to be claimed. If you come to claim your rights, please come to me first, for there is more to tell than I dare place on paper.

Your Humble Servant Ft. Martinus
_

Feeling need to confront his dark past, Marcus decided to journey to Italy and lay the family tragedy to rest. He confided in his soldales Fergus and they two planned to take the journey together. Pelleas would be left at the covenant to protect their vis sources and respond to any needs that arose, including requests by Alan, Lord of Galloway.

Fearing the worse. Fergus and Marcus began to prepare for the trip. Wanting to take extra time, they set their departure for the following spring so that there would be plenty of time to learn new arts and so that they would avoid traveling by sea in the stormy winter months.

Once the time came to depart they commissioned Bjorn, Captain of the See-Bjorn to take them from Galloway to the French Coast. The two mages took as their companions Annie of Wigtown to act as their steward for the trip, Hammish and Seamish for muscle, and Pollys the welsh scribe with the hopes that they could leave her at one of the covenants that they passed to continue her training and maybe copy some books. The took along plenty of vis to pay for such books and in the even that they needed it for their mission.

The two magi also decided to visit many covenants along the way to meet with their brethren in the Order of Hermes and learn more about their Order. For Fergus this was the first time he had left Scotland. Marcus’ only demand was that they avoid any covenants dominated by Tremere wizards.

Once he learned of their trip to Italy on one of his visits to the Covenant, Brother Padrig from the Abbey in Glen Luce asked to accompany them. He wanted to visit his Order’s mother house of the Cistercian Order in Cîteaux, near Dijon in eastern France. Taking this as a pilgrimage, he also hoped that he could accompany them at least to Rome where he wanted to seek some sort of absolution.

Soon they were off to Cherbourg, on the Normandy coast.

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SPRING 1222
The Grand Tour of France and Italy - Part 2
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Summer 1222
Monte Catillo de Vibio

The party from Scotland finally arrived in the central mountains of Italy. They sought the priest in the village of Tonio Fratta who sent Marcus the letter and learned that Marcus’ parents had not only been burned as witches, but that his maternal uncle had exposed their diabolism. Following their capture and executions, Marcus’ uncle the Baron Alfilio not only took the Malaspina family estate and rights in the town of Monte Castillo de Vibio, but he expanded the infernalist cult in the area.

Monte Castillo de Vibio has become a dark town when the sun goes down, filled with shadows that can harm the living and the ghost of the forsake and their victims among the town’s residents. Residents have fled the city when they have been able. But few leave now, most resigned to their lot. Still the town and the estate remains prosperous, even as their neighbor’s crops fail.

Marcus has learned that the local parish turns a blind eye to the Baron and his allies because the coffers continue to grow. This has kept interest from the Bishop of Perugia away, especially since he led the charges against the Malaspina’s when he was a parish priest and young canon at the cathedral in Perugia.

The priest also directed Marcus to a man who he said knew more about the evils there. He said the man was a drunk and possibly a heretic, but that he believed him. So off the party went to find Guido Massena, who was passed out in the mud beside the middens of the very tavern they were staying at.

Guido Massena as a dirty smelly scoundrel. He snarled more than he spoke. Once wine was offered, he told his tale. He said that he and other’s of his tradition battled the witches of Monte Castello de Vibio. These night battles had a certain set of rules, and that before BAron Alfillio took over, he had been told that they were little repercusions outside the battles themselves. Then in the last few years, the witches stopped fighting their seasonal night battles and started attacking his comrades in their homes and along the paths of Umbrian Mountains. Now he was one of the few nearby. Others who were more distant tried to refuse the call. He had not been found because he lived so low.

Massena told Marcus that he was a member of the Benandanti, the Good Walkers, who are summoned to serve as teens. They battle during the Ember Days, Church feasts, and fight against Infernal witches at agreed-on battlefields. They can fly, and can take the shape of animals or ride animals or tools. While the northern Italian Benandanti battle in human form and fight with bunches of fennel, while their foes use sorghum, here they take other forms. Massena did not tell the form but did refer to his comrades as his pack. Marcus was determined to learn more.

In the meantime, Brother Padrig suggested to the magi that they write the Bishop of Perugia or a Cardinal in Rome and seek aid. So he began researching who to write and said he would work with the Village Priest in this endeavor. Feargus and the men at arms went up the road to seek work as caravan guards as a cover to travel to the city.

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